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Movie review: 'Greedy Lying Bastards'

Posted 2:49pm on Thursday, Mar. 07, 2013

PG-13 (brief strong language); 88 min.


Seven years after An Inconvenient Truth, what has changed in the world's efforts to come to grips with global warming? The scientific consensus has firmed up, even further. Public opinion has, at last, fallen in line with science, assisted by any number of in-your-face extreme weather events -- epic droughts, record ice melts, multiple applications of the phrase "storm of the century."

But action? Nothing. By anyone.

So filmmaker Craig Scott Rosebraugh ( Seventh Generation) dispenses with conveniences and niceties and goes straight for the jugular with Greedy Lying Bastards, a documentary about the folks who have fought, stalled and misdirected the international conversation about this dire subject for decades.

"We knew decades ago" that this was coming, he adds. And to make his point, he shows a very young actor Darren McGavin converse with a scientist in a 1950s educational film, shaken by descriptions of "the drowned towers of Miami."

Rosebraugh's film is about why no action has been taken, and it names names -- discredited scientists, oil industry shills and out-and-out clowns (e.g. Lord Christopher Monckton), the people the climate-change-denying corners of the media trot out to cast doubt and delay action on the warming planet.

The days when one film could change this debate are past, Rosebraugh seems to be acknowledging. Perhaps he feels that by matching the rhetoric and tone of the denial camp, he can get himself heard above the din. Fortunately or unfortunately, that background noise now includes the howling wind of the latest superstorm and the cracks of the world's fast-disappearing glaciers. It's a wonder anybody gets heard above that.

Exclusive: Angelika Dallas

-- Roger Moore,

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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