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The Weekend Chef

Food porn: Our weekend chef's favorite food photos

Posted 4:12pm on Thursday, Apr. 12, 2012

I like to cook, love to eat and have been known to take a picture or two. Before I knew it I was mixing up my hobbies and taking pictures while I was cooking.

I knew I was in real trouble when I started taking my camera into my favorite sushi restaurant to take pictures of the sushi I ordered.

Now I have a Weekend Chef food blog on DFW.com, where I post pictures of what I cook on weekends. This slideshow above is a collection of some of my favorite pictures I have taken this year. I've also thrown in some of my sushi pics from one of my favorite sushi restaurant in Fort Worth, Wasabi Sushi.

I know I'm not the only one who likes taking pictures of food, and if you want to try it, sushi is a great dish to start with. Not only is sushi already “food styled," but it is already cold so you don’t have to worry about your food getting cold while you are taking your pictures. Cold food is common complaint from my wife if I take too long taking pictures. Also, be aware that some restaurants prefer you not to take pictures and may ask you to stop.

But if you want to give it a try, here are a few pointers:

1. Light: Use natural light instead of a flash if you can. Learn how to turn the flash off on your camera and use a natural light source, like a large window. If you are in a restaurant and there is no natural light, try looking for a brighter spot on the table or even move to a different table. All my sushi pictures were taken in bright spots I found at the sushi bar -- no flash.

2. Color balance: Check your camera's user manual and learn how to color balance your pictures, especially if you are not shooting in natural light. Yellow or blue cast food is not appetizing. Most cameras have light adjustment setting for shooting indoors in fluorescent or incandescent light.

3. Composition: Avoid a distracting background, make sure the food is the star. Try zooming in close to fill the picture with the food. Also try shooting at different angles like down low or at a slight angle.

4. Be quick and have fun: You don’t want your food to get cold! If the conditions are not right to take pictures, just skip it and enjoy your meal.

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